Homeschool Dad : Monday

While asking what homeschooling might do to my life, I also began to seek out typical schedules from across the web. I don’t say this often, but as I carried out this search, I was thankful for the internet. I was able to peruse a great many week-long breakdowns, among which mine will now digitally rest.

Since I’ve already shared a snapshot of a “typical” weekday from my perspective, I wanted to share the same from the perspective of the kiddos. I’ll discuss each day briefly, and then if I remember, I’ll post the full week in PDF format.

07:45am – wake kiddos
08:20am – stretch
08:25am – catechism & prayer
08:35am – family walk
09:00am – history
09:30am – chess
10:15am – literature
10:45am – language arts
11:20am – lunch
12:15pm – (take #4 to preschool)
12:45pm – science
01:15pm – math #1 (#2/#3 reading)
01:35pm – math #2 (#1/#3 reading)
02:00pm – math #3 (#1/#2 reading)
03:00pm – (retrieve #4 from preschool)

I’ve found stretching to be a great start to the day, as it gets everyone up and moving. I won’t lie, after going on my run, I welcome the stretches as well. It is a nice warm up into our family walk as well. At times, we’ll walk my wife to work (about 3/4mi away), or we’ll just wander the neighborhood. The kiddos have umbrellas, coats, and boots, and so far we’ve been able to get outside regardless of the weather.

With fresh air and a bit of movement under our belts, we start the day. I try to alternate word-heavy subjects with hands-on subjects in order to keep the kiddos engaged.

Catechism is a Q&A format of doctrinal instruction. It has obvious implications from a faith perspective, but it is also an exercise in memorization, which is helpful for the whole family!

On Monday, chess is a demonstrated lesson. This being our first year, we are working through the various pieces (with mini-games), terminology, maneuvers, strategy, etc. We apply what we’ve learned during play through the middle of the week.

We’ve settled on mathematics as one of two individualized subjects this year. It is a subject that can easily be customized, and this allows me to encourage and challenge the kiddos at their own pace. With three very different aptitudes, it only makes sense to focus this time for each kid.

This means that everything else is presented to the group (age 9, 9, and 7). We do most work around the dining room table, but we move around the house (inside and out), and around the town to change the setting when available and appropriate.

As a final note, the schedule has a wealth of time built in for the sake of flexibility. We walk around town a lot. We take breaks. We spend time in conversation. We make hot cocoa. We eat snacks. We use the bathroom. Lessons vary in length based on the day, the subject, and the material at hand. As I said in my last post, I give the day to my children. We have a routine, but we also have to leave room for life to happen!

I can talk more about specific classes and curriculum choices in the days/weeks to come. But for this week, it’s all about the schedule.

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On God, Family, and Grief: The Great Divorce #10

“If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple.” (Luke 14:26 ESV) 

When stripped of all context and understanding of the gospel, this verse is quite challenging. Through the eyes of sin and self-centeredness, this verse is downright offensive. And yet this is the call of Christ upon the life of any would-be disciple. At the start of Chapter 11, Lewis plays out the consequences of this particular verse and passage in the form of a conversation between Pam, a Ghost, and Reginald, her Bright-Spirit brother.

 

“the whole thickening treatment consists in learning to want God for his own sake.” (Reginald) 

Each and every Ghost seems to come to this country with a particular agenda. Each is looking for something from God, and none seem to be looking for God. Each comes with a complaint or an issue, some grudge against God for the events of their earthly lives. And in a fit of fantastic irony, they now want something from the God with whom they stand at odds. This is the case with Pam, whose son was taken from her sooner than she would have designed.

In self-centeredness, Pam is only able to see her own suffering & loss, and she completely fails to grasp the fact that God, too, has suffered. God suffered as humanity, the pinnacle of his creative work, chose sin and death over his glorious presence. God then suffered even further as his own son paid the ultimate price in order to bring redemption. Pam’s vision of God’s suffering, though, is blinded by her own. And that is the point of these conversations – each Bright Spirit is tasked with lifting the gaze of a sinner (even a suffering sinner) from the despair of humanity to the glory of God.

 

“no natural feelings are high or low, holy or unholy, in themselves. They are all holy when God’s hand is on the rein. They all go bad when they set up on their own and make themselves into false gods.” (Reginald) 

 

It’s amazing how a gaze fixed upon God through the cross of Christ can comfort grief, enhance joy, and provide eternal perspective. This is not to say that grief is not real and substantial. But feelings wrapped up in the flesh are but a trap if God’s hands are not on the reins. Pam was consumed by her grief without a focal point to define suffering. Christians will suffer, as will all until the curse of sin is completely removed. The encouragement of the Lord, though, is that suffering need not consume and define our existence if we have a buoy to grasp in the midst of tragedy.

 

“[the past] was all you chose to have. It was the wrong way to deal with sorrow. It was Egyptian – like embalming a dead body.” (Reginald) 

 

The beauty of the cross is the grace-enabled ability to reorient the viewpoint of the broken heart from the past to the future. Embalming is a strange practice when you think about it. Preserving death to make it seem alive. Or, by definition, to forestall decomposition. It is the art of keeping something which has died from looking as though it has died. It is the choice to live in the past. Our Ghost had chosen a future that was entirely oriented around the past. Again, and I can’t say this enough, I do not wish to minimize very real pain, but rather to say that there is a hope and a future which lifts our souls from the suffering of the world. To view the past from the present with a heart for our future – in Christ – is to have an eternal perspective. To be satisfied in such a view is to want God for his own sake, trusting his goodness with the details.

 

“I don’t say ‘more than Michael,’ not as a beginning. That will come later. It’s only the little germ of a desire for God that we need to start the process.” (Reginald) 

 

Looking back on Luke 14:26, I think of this quote. Loving God in Christ is not a matter of more or less. In other words, to love God over family is not simply to love God more than family. It is entirely possible to chase God in such a way as to abandon family, all the while claiming to love him more. This is backwards, for the Scriptures are also clear that adoration of God will enhance love for family.

To have a properly oriented view of the love of God is to love him first. As Lewis reveals in this chapter, such love is to want God for his own sake. From the love of God, then, every other love is strengthened as God takes hold of the reins. This does not mean the complete removal of pain, or even the complete perfection of love – not so long as the corruption and curse of sin remain. But it does mean a gaze heavenward to the cross of Christ, beholding his glory, his suffering, his redemption, and his promise. And it is a gospel-soaked, grace-infused fixation of the heart upon Jesus which will, all at once, reduce what we thought was real love on earth until it seems as hatred, and elevate that same love to a place of glory in the hands of God.

All we need is a little germ of desire to start the process.

Praise God that his grace is such a germ.

May it be so for you today.

 

 

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